Category: Rights

Texas Rep. Helen Giddings Denounces Hate, Calls for Moment of Silence in House Chamber

In the House chamber Monday, Texas Rep. Helen Giddings (D-DeSoto) called on the membership to stand with her as she denounced hatred, bigotry and terrorism in the wake of Saturday’s deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“Members, this past weekend, we witnessed a white supremacist hate group infiltrate the town of Charlottesville, Virginia, carrying torches on Friday night, on Saturday they filled the streets with venom, with bigotry and with violence,” Giddings said, before mentioning the three lives lost Saturday in the protest.

To continue reading this story go to NBC Dallas/Fort Worth.

House Democrats, business groups push for repeal of ‘sanctuary cities’ ban

AUSTIN – Texas House Democrats on Tuesday vowed to use “every conceivable tool” at their disposal to fight discriminatory legislation during the special session, including the so-called bathroom bill and a ban on ‘sanctuary cities.’

Members of the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, the Texas Legislative Black Caucus and other House Democrats wasted no time targeting the legislation.

To continue reading this story go to the El Paso Times.

Texas redistricting plans ‘lacked process’ and excluded minorities, Dallas lawmaker testifies FILED UNDER

SAN ANTONIO — A Dallas state representative said in federal court that there was a lack of a legislative process during the 2013 special session that redrew some of Texas’ electoral maps under court order.

“As a legislator, when we are trying to solve a problem … generally what we’ll do is bring in people who have a stake in the situation,” said Rep. Eric Johnson, D-Dallas. “I don’t recall anything like that happening in 2013 with respect to redistricting.

To continue reading this story go to the Dallas Morning News.

Texas Gov. Abbott signs bill to enforce reporting of police shootings

Starting in September, Texas law enforcement agencies could be fined $1,000 a day if they don’t report police shootings to the state in a timely manner.

Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday signed into law a bill that will add teeth to a law passed two years ago requiring departments to report to the attorney general’s office any time an officer is involved in a shooting that results in injury or death. State Rep. Eric Johnson, the author of House Bill 245, said repeatedly during this year’s legislative session that the threat of a fine will ensure the state has complete data on police shootings, a requirement to accurately study the issue in the state.

To continue reading this story go to the Texas Tribune.

Pardon the disturbance, but we refuse to be silent (Op-ed)

“[The Legislature is] the place to put down the guns, unclench the fists and act like decent, full-grown humans willing to solve their differences without violence. And — this is the part that actually makes it work — to abide by the results until the next time to fight, whether that’s in court, at the polls or in the next legislative session.”

Legislators show that men will be boys — if you let them

— Ross Ramsey, Texas Tribune

Texas Tribune Executive Editor Ross Ramsey attempts to minimize the events in the Texas House of Representatives on the last day of the session (“Men will be boys”), where a member of the majority party threatened a peaceful protest of an unjust law, calling U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and yelling for deportations. The protesters were predominantly Hispanic.

To continue reading this story go to Trib Talk.

Surprise: Senate tacks ‘bathroom bill,’ property-tax reform onto House measure

AUSTIN — In a surprise move, the Texas Senate early Wednesday tacked its controversial version of the ‘bathroom bill” and property-tax reform measures into a catch-all House bill.

But it was a trap, the House author of the so-called “Christmas tree” bill confirmed, and the measures added to it are now dead.

Among the 48 amendments the Senate tacked onto House Bill 4180 were the Senate-passed versions of Senate Bill 6 and Senate Bill 2, two measures the House had watered-down greatly before approving them in recent days.

To continue reading this story go to the Houston Chronicle.

Editorial: Maybe feds need to supervise Texas elections

Two court rulings, one last month about how state legislators redrew congressional districts in 2011 and one this week about the restrictive voter ID law adopted that same year, stand a good chance of landing Texas back under required federal review of any future changes in its election laws or procedures.

Think about that. We’d need Washington’s blessing on almost every aspect of our elections.

We’ve been there before — for decades.

We only got off the federal review list when the Supreme Court struck a match to it in 2013, ruling that the Voting Rights Act procedure for determining who was on the list was so outdated as to be unfair.

To continue reading this story, please visit the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.